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EverestHistory.com: Wang Fu-chou


Wang Fu-chou, Chinese, is credited as being the 7th person to Summit Everest, and the first from the North (Tibet-Chinese) side.

The Chinese ascent which was "discussed" for several years is accepted today as the first ascent from the North side. The Chinese attributed their success to the Chinese political system emphasizing the fact that they prevailed on the route that the British failed at. 

1960: Chinese and Tibetan team of 214 men and women, led by Shih Chan-chun, makes the first summit of Everest via the North Col and Northeast Ridge. Long doubted by Western mountaineers because of the lack of a summit photo and the claim of summiting at night, the photos and film the Chinese did release reveal that they at least climbed the Second Step, the key to the route (although Reinhold Messner claims he possesses documentation proving they didn't climb it, so far this evidence has not been produced). The final assault party of Wang Fu-chou, Liu Lien-man, Chu Ying-hua, and the Tibetan Konbu aka Gonbu (also known as Gonpa) assaulted the final 15 foot (5 meter) Second Step headwall using pitons and team tactics. After Liu Lien- man repeatedly falls off attempting to lead the pitch, Chu Yin-hua takes off his boots and socks, and using a shoulder stand climbs the last vertical pitch in bare feet! Exhausted by his effort, Liu Lien-man is forced to halt at 28,600 feet (8,700 meters), but the remaining three climbers make it to the summit where they purportedly leave a plaster bust of Chairman Mao by a rock outcrop.

Rumors of a 1952 Russian expedition that resulted in failure continue....

 




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